Photo Ark

Saving species through the power of photography

Want to see every single species of animals, all in one place? That's just what National Geographic is trying to create. From cuddly cute to outrageously strange, we want to see—and save—them all! 

Through a project called Photo Ark, photographer Joel Sartore is visiting zoos and wildlife sanctuaries around the world to snap pictures of approximately 20,000 species of captive animals, and so far he's photographed 11,000—and counting! He hopes the photos will inspire people to save the planet’s most endangered animals. 

A giant panda at Zoo Atlanta
A giant panda at Zoo Atlanta
Photograph by Joel Sartore, National Geographic Photo Ark
What's this animal?
What's this animal?
Photograph by Joel Sartore, National Geographic Photo Ark, Nat Geo Image Collection
Like all frogs, the golden gliding frog from Asia moves its eyes down into its head when it swallows. This helps push food down its throat.
Like all frogs, the golden gliding frog from Asia moves its eyes down into its head when it swallows. This helps push food down its throat.
Photograph by Joel Sartore, National Geographic Photo Ark
<i>CAN YOU HAIR ME NOW?:</i> An aardwolf tells other African animals to back off by lifting up the hair on its back, making the critter seem larger than it is.
CAN YOU HAIR ME NOW?: An aardwolf tells other African animals to back off by lifting up the hair on its back, making the critter seem larger than it is.
Photograph by Joel Sartore, National Geographic Photo Ark
The scales of the Bismarck ringed python, which lives on the islands off of Papua New Guinea, are bright orange and black when young but fade to brown as the snake ages.
The scales of the Bismarck ringed python, which lives on the islands off of Papua New Guinea, are bright orange and black when young but fade to brown as the snake ages.
PHOTOGRAPH BY JOEL SARTORE, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC PHOTO ARK

Photo Ark videos: Go behind the scenes